Book Reviews

The Wasp that Brainwashed the Caterpillar: Evolution’s Most Unbelievable Solutions to Life’s Biggest Problems by Matt Simon (Ebook)

The Wasp that Brainwashed the Caterpillar: Evolution's Most Unbelievable Solutions to Life's Biggest Problems by Matt Simon

The author of this book is a science writer for Wired Magazine, where he specializes in weird stuff. In this collection of anecdotes, he leads his readers through land and sea, and finds animals that have adapted to do really weird things in order to mate, feed their progeny, or feed themselves. I very much enjoyed this book, though it does make one a trifle afraid to go outside and play. Continue reading

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The Seven Daughters of Eve: The Science That Reveals Our Genetic Ancestry by Bryan Sykes, Narrated by Michael Page (Audiobook)

The Seven Daughters of Eve: The Science That Reveals Our Genetic Ancestry by Bryan Sykes

I listened to this non-fiction book while traveling. It it a fascinating discussion of the science of mitochondrial genetics (published in 2001), and I loved listening to the book.  Continue reading

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The Romanovs: 1613-1918 by Simon Sebag Montefiore

The Romanovs 1613-1918 by Simon Sebag Montefiore

 

This was a very comprehensive nonfiction book about the Romanov Dynasty in Russia, from Michael I, who became the Tsar (and the first of the Romanovs) at the age of sixteen in 1613, to Nicholas II, who was forced to abdicate in 1917 (and was murdered in 1918, along with his wife and children). It was a fascinating non-fiction book, and I very much enjoyed reading it. Continue reading

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Spellbound: The Surprising Origins and Astonishing Secrets of English Spelling by James Essinger (Ebook)

Spellbound: The Surprising Origins and Astonishing Secrets of English Spelling by James Essinger

I finished reading this nonfiction book today, and I very much enjoyed discovering the basic story of how I, a woman writing in 2018 in SouthWestCentral Louisiana, is using essentially the same language used by Chaucer and Shakespeare, who wrote when native speakers of English were no more than four million souls (and when those who could write their language with any degree of eptitude were perhaps numbered considerably less than a million). It is a fascinating story, and one that I loved reading. Continue reading

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Please Explain by Karl Kruszelnicki (Ebook)

Please Explain by Karl Kruszelnicki

I finished reading this nonfiction Ebook while in the comfy chairs at my local Barnes and Noble, and I can say that this enjoyable book is great for comfy chair reading. Continue reading

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A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman, Translated by Henning Koch

A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman, Translated by Henning Koch

This is the book that I read for my Third Tuesday Book Club meeting this next Tuesday night (May 15th). It is a novel about the interconnection of people, and one that I very much enjoyed reading. Continue reading

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How Chance and Stupidity Have Changed History: The Hinge Factor by Erik Durschmied (Ebook)

How Chance and Stupidity Have Changed History: The Hinge Factor by Erik Durschmied

I finished reading this book last night, and it is a book on how certain history-changing battles throughout history have been decided on relatively minor issues. I very much enjoyed reading this book. Continue reading

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Blood and Guts: A Short History of Medicine by Roy Porter (Ebook)

Blood and Guts: A Short History of Medicine by Roy Porter

This relatively short book is a History of Medicine, taking us from ancient times to the dawn of the 21st Century. I very much enjoyed reading it, and it does give very good information about Medicine. Continue reading

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Strange and Obscure Stories of the Revolutionary War by Tim Rowland (Ebook)

Strange and Obscure Stories of the Revolutionary War by Tim Rowland

This book is a humorous look at some of the personalities and events of the American Revolutionary War. As such, I very much enjoyed my reading of this book, and would recommend it cheerfully. Continue reading

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The House of Unexpected Sisters by Alexander McCall Smith

The House of Unexpected Sisters by Alexander McCall Smith

This is yet another book in the No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series, set in Botswana. And I very much enjoyed reading this latest book. Continue reading

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House Rules by Jodi Picoult

House Rules by Jodi Picoult

I finished reading this book today; we will be discussing it at my Third Tuesday Book Club meeting tomorrow (January 16th, 2018), although there is a distinct possibility that the meeting might be moved to Tuesday of next week due to inclement weather being forecast for tomorrow. This is a book about abilities and disabilities, and about the lengths that one will go to for family, and I very much enjoyed reading it. Continue reading

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See What I’m Saying: The Extraordinary Powers of our Five Senses by Lawrence D. Rosenblum (Ebook)

See What I'm Saying: The Extraordinary Powers of our Five Senses by Lawrence D. Rosenblum

I finished reading this book last night via Kindle on my tablet, and I found it to be quite fascinating, and a great read. (Note to my readers: being congenitally anosmiac, I have no sense of smell, and my friends will attest that I seem to be senseless in other ways as well.) Continue reading

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The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon

I finished reading this novel (published in 2003) for my Third Tuesday Book Club (which meets tomorrow evening, November 21st), and I very much enjoyed it. It is a book about living as an outsider, and also about relationships, goals, and families. Continue reading

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The Old Farmer’s Almanac 2018

The Old Farmer's 2018 Almanac

For many years now I have gotten the Old Farmer’s Almanac, and this year was no exception; and as usual, I have enjoyed reading it, and will be happily using it during the coming year. Continue reading

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Periodic Tales: A Cultural History of the Elements, from Arsenic to Zinc by Hugh Aldersey-Williams (Ebook)

Periodic Tales: A Cultural History of the Elements, from Arsenic to Zinc by Hugh Aldersey-Williams

This is a book about the elements that make up everything about us; but it is also a book about how various elements have been regarded throughout history. As such, it is a fascinating book, and one that I enjoyed reading. Continue reading

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The Book of Speculation by Erika Swyler (Ebook)

The Book of Speculation by Erika Swyler

As is my normal procedure, I have finished reading this novel (via Kindle) a day ahead of our Third Tuesday Book Club meeting tomorrow (October 17th, 2017) to discuss the book. This is a novel full of secrets and family issues, with carnivals, Tarot cards, and horseshoe crabs thrown in for good measure, and I very much enjoyed reading it. Continue reading

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The Cutthroat by Clive Cussler and Justin Scott, Read by Scott Brick (Audiobook)

The Cutthroat by Clive Cussler and Justin Scott, Read by Scott Brick

I finished listening to this Audiobook, the latest in the mystery series starring Isaac Bell, the Chief Investigator of the early Twentieth Century Van Dorn Detective Agency.  This book is a worthy addition to the series, and I enjoyed listening to it. Continue reading

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